volunteering

Do you want to help keep your community clean? Become a Clean Streets LA partner!

If you're interested in becoming involved with Clean Streets LA in your community, check out the Mayor's Volunteer Corps for more opportunities. And don't forget, you can always call 311 or use the MyLA311 app to report abandoned waste and illegal dumping in the public right of way near you.

To download the MyLA311 app, visit Google Play or Apple App Store.

Watch Clean Streets LA crews hard at work in your neighborhood.

Call 311 or use the MyLA311 app to report abandoned waste and illegal dumping in the public right of way near you. When making a report, please provide as much detail about the location and debris as possible so the appropriate level of resources can be directed to the site.

To download the MyLA311 app, visit Google Play or Apple App Store.

Come help Beautify Western Ave on Saturday, June 11, 2016

Join Mayor Eric Garcetti, Councilmember David Ryu, and arts nonprofit Beautify Earth to Beautify Western Ave, one of LA's Great Streets. They need help to paint murals, pick up litter and prune street landscaping. 

Meet Saturday, June 11, 2016, 8:30 am, at the intersection of Melrose and Western Ave.

RSVP at greatstreets@lacity.org, 213-922-9766 or visit lamayor.org/greatstreets

Are you looking for an opportunity to volunteer in your community?

Check out the Mayor's Volunteer Corps. They have a long list of projects in your neighborhood that you can get involved in, including community clean ups and other Clean Streets events.

Sign up today!

"We have so much nature around us that we just don’t realize it."

Saturday, April 23, 2016  North East Trees – Ascot Hills Park

Saturday, April 23, 2016

North East Trees – Ascot Hills Park

“I am out here on behalf of my company, Apple. They coordinated this charitable effort to celebrate Earth Day. So I thought it was a great opportunity. I love nature. I love the landscape L.A. has to offer. I go hiking all the time and I wanted to give back and plant a tree. This is the first time I ever planted a tree so it’s a new thing to learn for me. I forgot to consider how many bugs live in the earth. There were a lot that came up and surprised me when digging up those holes, but it was a very rewarding experience. To know that trees can live for centuries, if you think of it that way, you are contributing to the earth for decades and centuries to come. What humans can do to the earth can be so destructive and as a society we are not completely conscious of it. So I think the challenge is really just awareness. I didn’t think to seek out an effort like this. It was presented to me through work and I am really grateful that it came by that way. So the first step is letting people know there are organizations like North East Trees that exist and it’s just so easy to get started. We have so much nature around us that we just don’t realize it. Planting trees is fun. Putting on gloves and getting dirty and being handed a shovel and digging a hole is fun. Just give it a chance.”

"I advise any person to get outdoors and work, get that vitamin D, it’ll help."

West Adams Neighborhood Council at Westside Park.

West Adams Neighborhood Council at Westside Park.

“I have a community garden here and I’ve lived in this neighborhood for 30 years. A few of us got asked about all this trash up against the fence. It should be cleaned up and kept clean because we keep our area up. We probably have a hundred kids out here today. It’s fantastic. It really is. It’s awesome. They’re a good group of people and they’re working hard too. I hope the community continues to get involved and help out more. It’s a lot of fun. You also get a lot of exercise. You see me sweating now, but I am enjoying it. And I advise any person to get outdoors and work, get that vitamin D, it’ll help. It’s great for you especially as you get older.”

"It’s a place like a refuge."

Saturday, April 23, 2016  North East Trees – Ascot Hills Park

Saturday, April 23, 2016

North East Trees – Ascot Hills Park

“In a big metropolitan area there’s very little nature left, but Los Angeles has more open natural space than probably other big cities like New York and Chicago. But still, people who live in areas that are densely populated, largely developed, with everything concrete and asphalt, it’s rare to find this kind of a big opportunity, so people are drawn. I think it’s a natural and innate thing for people to be drawn to nature and open space. It’s a place like a refuge. It’s a place to come for relaxation, for recreation, to get one’s self grounded and connected, and it’s a lot cheaper than therapy (laughing). No, I think people have this natural need to connect with nature. So when people come up here to Ascot and they actually have the chance to get their hands in the soil and put new plants in the ground and smell the plants and see the bugs and hear the birds, I think it’s something people really enjoy doing. So we are happy to provide this opportunity. We use the park in a way as a vehicle just for that; for people to come out and learn, to experience, to be aware of or just to connect with nature here in the city.”